film

First Kiss

Sharing a first kiss with somebody is definitely something personal, probably because it can be very weird, uncomfortable and very awkward. It can be nerve-racking, but it can also be magical.

Los Angeles-based, amateur filmmaker Tatia Pilieva, along with Wren Studio managed to create a three-minute video that successfully captures the most transient of human interactions, the fist kiss. Heart stopping and breathtaking moments are present in this unique and romantic video.

Twenty Strangers, straight, gay, young and old were chosen and paired off,  and with barely any guidance f they were asked to take their time and whenever they were ready simply share a kiss.

The neutral colour of the set, use of black and white  and the beautiful background music makes everyone look equal, and creates a sweet and romantic tone to the video. The artist managed to capture the beauty of strangers sharing a kiss for the first time, and for me, the weird, awkward and uncomfortable feelings experienced are what make this film so unique, true and beautiful.

It kind of makes you think, how do first kisses look like? How do they feel like? Because in ‘real life’, you don’t get the chance to witness fists kisses too often, and you definitely never get to kiss someone for the first time twice.

What did you think about this video? I have heard and read many different opinions, and I would love to know what you thought as well. 

Thank you for reading,
Elli

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EAT

This is the second post, out of a series of three posts, with the title MOVE-EAT-LEARN, each focusing on a different short film, created by Rick Mereki. If you have read my previous posts, you probably know the following information already, but for those who are visiting for the first time, I will provide some information about Rick Mereki, and his series of these three, 1-minute films.

Rick Mereki, along with Andrew Lees as an actor and Tim White as a cameraman collaborated in creating these three short films that started as  an assignment from a travel agency. They were asked to shoot a very short film around the world, for STA Travel Australia. Their adventure started, and with only 2 cameras available, they travelled 38.000 miles which is approximately two times around the earth. They recorded their discoveries and  experiences and brought back with them almost one terabyte of raw video footage, from which they only kept the best parts to create three 1-minute-clips. The  music of the films is an original composed by Kelsey James.

This post, makes me think about the new trend, that has been going on the last years that has to do with people that enjoy taking photos of their meals and posting them on social media (Instagram, Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter etc) . I personally tend to do the same thing, I, am not really sure why, but I do. This film actually makes me connect the artistic part of taking photos of food with the cultural aspect as well. Food is not just something that we need to consume in order to survive, it says a lot about our personality, our lifestyle, our background and our culture.

The specific film focuses more on the cultural aspect of food. It illustrates in a quick but beautiful way, how food changes from country to country. Based on the countries climate and resources but mostly, traditions and culture, food is is thought and created differently. In  ‘EAT’ , I loved how you can see the image of different meals prepared, combined with other completely different ones from other cuisines and countries that are not connected at all. I found my self enjoying the film and trying to match every meal with the country I thought it originated. The rhythm of the music and the fast change from one shot to the other, made it harder but  fun and entertaining.

Rick Mereki posted the following quote to his tumblr account, as a comment to his own work for ‘EAT’ short film. In my opinion, the reason why he posted this quote was to focus on the fact that what makes food interesting is our effect on it. And by travelling to different countries and experiencing different cultures, you get the chance to come across different people and understand why they create food they way they do from eating habits and traditions.

Breakfast is the only meal of the day that I tend to view with the same kind of traditionalized reverence that most people associate with Lunch and Dinner. I like to eat breakfast alone, and almost never before noon; anybody with a terminally jangled lifestyle needs at least one psychic anchor every twenty-four hours, and mine is breakfast. In Hong Kong, Dallas or at home — and regardless of whether or not I have been to bed — breakfast is a personal ritual that can only be properly observed alone, and in a spirit of genuine excess. The food factor should always be massive: four Bloody Marys, two grapefruits, a pot of coffee, Rangoon crepes, a half-pound of either sausage, bacon, or corned beef hash with diced chiles, a Spanish omelette or eggs Benedict, a quart of milk, a chopped lemon for random seasoning, and something like a slice of Key lime pie, two margaritas, and six lines of the best cocaine for dessert… Right, and there should also be two or three newspapers, all mail and messages, a telephone, a notebook for planning the next twenty-four hours and at least one source of good music… All of which should be dealt with outside, in the warmth of a hot sun, and preferably stone naked             – Hunter S. Thompson

This short film made me look at photos of food in a different way. Look deeper into where the ingredients came from, the way they were cooked and combined and what that said about the person that prepared them, about his habits, personality, culture and background. I hope that this post will make you thing about those things when consuming or just when looking at food.

Thanks for reading,

Elli

MOVE

A form of art that I haven’t written a post so far, is film. Having numerous film classes in my current course, I have become very interested in watching and creating short films such as advertisements, promos, campaigns and documentaries. For that reason, I decided to research a very talented, in my opinion director; Rick Mereki. What made me choose the specific director was his great passion for travel. This post is going to be the first out of  three that I will be posting, all created from Rick Mereki and his travelling experiences, called: MOVE-EAT-LEARN. 

Rick Mereki, along with Andrew Lees as an actor and Tim White as a cameraman collaborated in creating these three short films that started as  an assignment from a travel agency. They were asked to shoot a very short film around the world, for STA Travel Australia. Their adventure started, and with only 2 cameras available, they travelled 38.000 miles which is approximately two times around the earth. They recorded their discoveries and  experiences and brought back with them almost one terabyte of raw video footage, from which they only kept the best parts to create three 1-minute-clips. The  music of the films is an original composed by Kelsey James.

I can’t simply choose what it is that I love about this film, because I would have to say everything. The music makes you feel like a part of the experience, the quick pace of the film makes you fully committed to it and does not let you get your eyes of the screen. Moreover, direction here is excellent. The way one short take follows the next one is directed and filmed in an incredible and detailed way, that makes the effect of the film so successful. In that way, Mereki has managed to present footage from six weeks, and shots from numerous countries just in sixty seconds.

In ‘MOVE’, every single second is precious, plays an significant part of the whole concept and has an different meaning. The concept of MOVE is powerful; showing people that traveling inspires us to do, to dare and to discover what lies beyond the consolations of our comfort zones.

Researching more about Rick Mereki, I was reading on of his interviews online, from the ‘Travel and Leisure’ website, and I was very interested to the following question, that was asking the director ‘What has travel come to mean after visiting so many countries in just six weeks’

The more you travel, the more you become attached and connected to the world as a whole. I think that if a greater number of us spent time outside our comfort zones and immersed in other cultures, even for a little while, it would help reduce the “Us vs. Them” mentality that still exists in the world. People will always naturally base their beliefs and opinions on what is best for their family, their city, their country…but I think travel helps create mindsets that are more global.

What I love in such short but original films is the effect they have on me. The specific film gave me the motivation and inspiration to dare, to want to do something different, to take the time to travel around, discover the beauty of our world and experience it in my own, personal way. 

How did this film make you feel?

Thank you for reading,

Elli

What art form do you like the most?

Hello everyone,

It is hard to decide who your favourite artist is, or which is your favourite artwork, and this is because there are countless artists around the world, but more importantly art takes many different forms. So, what is your favourite form of art?

I would really appreciate if you could take a minute of your time and answer the following poll. It will help me get an idea of which form of art people enjoy the most and more importantly it will help my research for future posts. Please choose only one.

Thank you very much for reading and completing my poll 

Elli 

Flavour so Beautiful

Have you ever tasted something so delicious that you felt like a small explosion took place inside your mouth? Well this is what an explosion of flavours literally looks like! 

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 13.00.06

This is a Screen shot of Schwartz Flavour shots, “Sound of taste” advertisement

Its well known that different foods and spices are tasty and delicious, but who would imagine that they could be beautiful as well. This art audio-visual installation created by Schwartz Flavour Shots, is trying to illustrate how an explosion of flavour one tastes, literally looks like. For this Project, DJ MJ Cole, Filmmaker Chris Crains and pyrotechnics designers Machine Shop collaborated with Schwartz Flavour Shots to create this unique installation.

A combination of foods and spices were used for this installation to happen. Several tons of black pepper corns, cardamon, turmeric, paprika, cumin seeds, ginger, chilli, basil, corn, salt and many other beautiful and colourful spices were placed in explosive bags, rigged to explode on certain music notes.

What I really love about this installation is the fact that numerous explosions can look not only powerful, but peaceful and beautiful at the same time. With the combination of this carefully selected music, food has never looked this appealing. I really like the attention in detail. More specifically, I enjoyed the high resolution shots of the different spices mixed together. From the close-up shots, you can see the details on the green basil leaves, and the way they are mixed with cumin seeds and all the other spices. From the long shots, details are not visible, which makes it interesting to see how spices have the ability to look like different colour powders   mixed together.

The Following video is a behind the scenes short video that  explains in detail, how the music composers managed to create peaceful music which brought together all the elements of this installation.

In my opinion, what makes this installation truly amazing, is the music used throughout the video. Music, is what brings all the other elements together and makes this installation ‘work’. When this project first started Schwartz asked the music composers to show how food feels through their music. So music was written with the intention of communicating what is like to taste something and developed in terms of intensity. The second step was to take the music written and use it to trigger explosions with herbs and spices. In music you can have different timbres that I guess relate to different flavours, and colours relate to different cords”MJ Cole (Composer) The way that worked was that when music was played, each key that was pressed resulted into an explosion. The main intention was to create an audio visual feast. So a matrix of spice sacks was used and then pyrotechnics were trigger in the bottom of the sacks.

 “So I hope people find it satisfying, vibrant, colourful, exciting thing to watch”, MJ Cole

In my opinion, MJ Cole and his team managed to do exactly that! What did you think?