EAT

This is the second post, out of a series of three posts, with the title MOVE-EAT-LEARN, each focusing on a different short film, created by Rick Mereki. If you have read my previous posts, you probably know the following information already, but for those who are visiting for the first time, I will provide some information about Rick Mereki, and his series of these three, 1-minute films.

Rick Mereki, along with Andrew Lees as an actor and Tim White as a cameraman collaborated in creating these three short films that started as  an assignment from a travel agency. They were asked to shoot a very short film around the world, for STA Travel Australia. Their adventure started, and with only 2 cameras available, they travelled 38.000 miles which is approximately two times around the earth. They recorded their discoveries and  experiences and brought back with them almost one terabyte of raw video footage, from which they only kept the best parts to create three 1-minute-clips. The  music of the films is an original composed by Kelsey James.

This post, makes me think about the new trend, that has been going on the last years that has to do with people that enjoy taking photos of their meals and posting them on social media (Instagram, Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter etc) . I personally tend to do the same thing, I, am not really sure why, but I do. This film actually makes me connect the artistic part of taking photos of food with the cultural aspect as well. Food is not just something that we need to consume in order to survive, it says a lot about our personality, our lifestyle, our background and our culture.

The specific film focuses more on the cultural aspect of food. It illustrates in a quick but beautiful way, how food changes from country to country. Based on the countries climate and resources but mostly, traditions and culture, food is is thought and created differently. In  ‘EAT’ , I loved how you can see the image of different meals prepared, combined with other completely different ones from other cuisines and countries that are not connected at all. I found my self enjoying the film and trying to match every meal with the country I thought it originated. The rhythm of the music and the fast change from one shot to the other, made it harder but  fun and entertaining.

Rick Mereki posted the following quote to his tumblr account, as a comment to his own work for ‘EAT’ short film. In my opinion, the reason why he posted this quote was to focus on the fact that what makes food interesting is our effect on it. And by travelling to different countries and experiencing different cultures, you get the chance to come across different people and understand why they create food they way they do from eating habits and traditions.

Breakfast is the only meal of the day that I tend to view with the same kind of traditionalized reverence that most people associate with Lunch and Dinner. I like to eat breakfast alone, and almost never before noon; anybody with a terminally jangled lifestyle needs at least one psychic anchor every twenty-four hours, and mine is breakfast. In Hong Kong, Dallas or at home — and regardless of whether or not I have been to bed — breakfast is a personal ritual that can only be properly observed alone, and in a spirit of genuine excess. The food factor should always be massive: four Bloody Marys, two grapefruits, a pot of coffee, Rangoon crepes, a half-pound of either sausage, bacon, or corned beef hash with diced chiles, a Spanish omelette or eggs Benedict, a quart of milk, a chopped lemon for random seasoning, and something like a slice of Key lime pie, two margaritas, and six lines of the best cocaine for dessert… Right, and there should also be two or three newspapers, all mail and messages, a telephone, a notebook for planning the next twenty-four hours and at least one source of good music… All of which should be dealt with outside, in the warmth of a hot sun, and preferably stone naked             – Hunter S. Thompson

This short film made me look at photos of food in a different way. Look deeper into where the ingredients came from, the way they were cooked and combined and what that said about the person that prepared them, about his habits, personality, culture and background. I hope that this post will make you thing about those things when consuming or just when looking at food.

Thanks for reading,

Elli

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9 comments

  1. I like that bit you quoted about breakfast! I feel almost the same way. At the moment, my husband, our son, and I live in a tiny apartment where we don’t have a real dining table. Still, when it’s time for me to have breakfast, I grab a stool and settle into a corner of the counter space to eat. I might have an audiobook going on or I might look at my Facebook page or check email on my iPad. It’s my quiet moment and if I didn’t have a project waiting, I’m in danger of spending the rest of the day in that corner still working on breakfast (I’m a slow eater).

    Thank you for dropping by my blog =)

  2. Cool video. I was trying to match the food with a country too. haha.
    Experience of food is unique to each person, place and time. I think this is why I love food shows, especially ones that combine food and travel.
    I enjoy posting food photos because it’s usually a nice reminder of an experience. Food is an experience in itself that we share with the makers of it and the people we eat with 😀

  3. First, thanks for following my blog (and leading me to yours).

    Your series title reminds me of (and I expect directly or indirectly from ) a long series of visual arts memes that had a hay day in the pop art movement, and particularly in the work of Robert Indiana – here are some of his works incorporating the EAT – [word] [word] theme: http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=robert+indiana+eat&qpvt=robert+indiana+eat&FORM=IGRE

    Before him Marsden Hartly, a big influence in Indiana’s work, explored the same approach. And now others are following Indiana’s lead today. The power of presenting words as art, and vis-versa, is apparently strong and broadly appealing.

    Andy

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